Weekly Links

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

Chelsea Record: Kickstarting the Heart:Downtown District Coordinator Looks to Launch Events
The bones of downtown Chelsea are discussed often.

Google: What does home look like?
132,383 house drawing made by real people… on the internet

Boston Globe: Somerville Strikes Deal on Assembly Row affordable housing
After a standoff, Somerville officials will allow the developer to build fewer affordable units than city rule requires.

CityLab: California's Legal Assault On NIMBYs Begins
Over 100 bills aim to fix the state’s severe housing crisis, including many that would crack down on developers and communities that aren’t doing their part.

Chelsea Record: Chelsea Welcomes Robert Wood Johnson Team Today, Friday
A team of leaders from the City, the non-profit sector and from Mass General-Chelsea were ready to roll out the red carpet on May 18 and 19 as evaluators from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation pay a visit to Chelsea to see what makes the town tick.

LA Times: Trump administration appears to ease up on its threat against 'sanctuary cities'
In an apparent retreat on the war against cities and counties that refuse to cooperate with immigration enforcement, the Trump administration has settled on a narrow definition of what it means to be a “sanctuary city,” and limited the potential financial consequences for state and local governments.

StreetBlog: After Boston’s Mayor Blames Crash Victims, Pop-Up Comics Push for Better Bike Lanes
Boston’s latest do-it-yourself bike lane intervention might seem a bit sketchy — because it uses comics to prod City Hall for needed safety improvements.

Revere Journal: City Looks to Partner With New Developers of Suffolk Downs Site
Being billed as the largest development possibly ever on the North Shore when construction begins at the Suffolk Downs property, the project could take 10 or 15 years to be fully developed. Either way the development will have an impact on Revere for the next 50 years.

Highland Terrace LEED certification

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as “LEED,” was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones.

  • Highland Terrace is the first property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio that pursued LEED certification. The U.S. Green Building Council recognized Highland Terrace with “Platinum” status – the highest ranking possible. Highland Terrace was the first building in Chelsea to be recognized as LEED Platinum. Highland Terrace and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:
  • Site Selection: Highland Terrace is an urban infill development, redeveloping a former industrial property, close to downtown Chelsea. It puts an underused property back to productive use, and reduces demand for development of undisturbed open space. Highland Terrace uses existing infrastructure, and promotes public transit and walking so that residents have multiple transportation options.
  • Site Design: With a density of 35 units per acre, Highland Terrace protects undisturbed land by developing housing a more compact site, and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life to the Box District and new residents to downtown. The public park next door provides children and adults with space for outdoor recreation. The site is designed to reduce erosion and stormwater runoff. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings and minimizes the use of grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  •   Materials & Resources: During construction, Highland Terrace’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project used products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of Highland Terrace’s apartments include high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, and the property’s landscape irrigation system includes a central shut-off valve and moisture sensor, to minimize water use. Highland Terrace was also certified under the Energy Star program, based on its reduction of electricity usage and efficient mechanical systems.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation, and each apartment has high-grade air filters typically used in schools and other institutional settings, to stop contaminants from entering homes. Highland Terrace has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments and without a parking garage – both of which are common sources of lower air quality. (Parking is available to residents in a surface lot, adjacent to the building.)
  •   Education and Operations:  As part of developing Highland Terrace, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living. This will include training on operation and use of the property, including its green features.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to the Box District neighborhood. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

525 Beach LEED certification

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as LEED, was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones. 525 Beach is the second property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio to be certified under the LEED program. 525 Beach and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:

  • Site Selection: 525 Beach is an urban infill development, redeveloping a former industrial property in a dense residential neighborhood of Revere. 525 Beach’s 30 new apartments are only a five-minute walk from the MBTA Blue Line and Revere Beach, connecting residents to valuable amenities by walking. The development puts an underutilized property back to productive use, which reduces demand for undisturbed open space. 525 Beach uses existing infrastructure, and promotes public transit and walking so that residents have multiple transportation options.
  • Site Design: With a density of 71 units per acre, 525 Beach protects undisturbed land by developing housing on a compact site and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life. Revere Beach and Costa Park, a local public park, are within a five-minute walk, which provides children and adults with space for outdoor recreation. The site is designed to reduce erosion and stormwater runoff. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings, does not use any grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  • Materials & Resources: During construction, 525 Beach’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project will also use products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of 525 Beach’s apartments will feature high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, and the property’s landscape irrigation system is designed to minimize water usage. The building’s exterior walls are designed to moderate temperature within the building, to reduce the energy needed to heat and cool the building. In the building’s hallways, the lights operate on occupancy sensors, which reduces the amount of electricity used.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. The apartments’ walls are carefully sealed to minimize the transfer of air across apartments or into the hallway, and fresh air is delivered directly to each apartment through sealed ducts. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation. 525 Beach has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments – a common source of lower air quality.
  • Education and Operations:  As part of developing 525 Beach, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living.  This has included promoting LEED and “green” design to residents when they moved into the building, and training the property maintenance staff on operation and use of the property, including its green features.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to Revere. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

One Beach LEED Mid-Rise Program

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as “LEED,” was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones. One Beach is the third property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio to be certified under the LEED program. One Beach and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:

  • Site Selection: One Beach is located in downtown Revere, which gives its residents excellent access to neighborhood amenities and public transit. Within a half-mile walk are local shops, cafes and bank branches, parks, the Revere Public Library, the Rossetti-Cowan Senior Center, and places of worship. Three MBTA bus routes – the 116, 117 and 119 – have stops immediately in front of the building. Residents have multiple transportation options, and can reach their day-to-day needs by walking, which reduces the need to use a car and the number of vehicle miles traveled. The development also puts a vacant property back to productive use, which reduces demand for undisturbed open space and uses existing infrastructure.
  • Site Design: With a density of 71 units per acre, One Beach protects undisturbed land by developing housing on a compact site and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings, does not use any grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  • Materials & Resources: During construction, One Beach’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project will also use products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of One Beach’s apartments include high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, reducing the use of water. The landscaping’s irrigation system is also designed to use water efficiently. The system uses drip irrigation, and it knows when there was a recent rainstorm, so not to waste water. The building’s exterior walls are designed to moderate temperature within the building, by using a thick, spray-foam insulation in the exterior wall cavities and below the roof. This type of insulation reduce the energy needed to heat and cool the building.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. The apartments’ walls are carefully sealed to minimize the transfer of air across apartments or into the hallway, and fresh air is delivered directly to each apartment through sealed ducts. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation. One Beach has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments and without a parking garage – both of which are common sources of lower air quality. (Parking is available to residents in a surface lot, adjacent to the building.)
  • Education and Operations:  As part of developing One Beach, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living. This has included promoting LEED and “green” design to residents when they moved into the building, training the property maintenance staff on operation and use of the property, including its green features, and promoting LEED at the construction site and in the local newspaper.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to Revere. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

Weekly Links

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

NYT: How Homeownership Became the Engine of American Inequality
An enormous entitlement in the tax code props up home prices — and overwhelmingly benefits the wealthy and the upper middle class.

Chelsea Record: City Schedules Hearing for Strip Club at Zoning Board
A hearing before the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) for the Phantom Ventures strip club on Beacham Street has been scheduled for next Tuesday, May 9, in City Hall.

Chelsea Record: Chelsea Marches on Washington
The Chelsea group travelled by bus from the City to the nation’s capital. Meanwhile, protesters from Chelsea make their way down Pennsylvania Avenue during the march.

NPR: FreshAir--The Color of Law
Author Richard Rothstein says the housing programs begun under the New Deal were tantamount to a "state-sponsored system of segregation," in which people of color were purposely excluded from suburbs.

NYT: A Public Overdose. An Antidote at Hand. Would Passers-By Use It?
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Across the country, someone dies of an opioid overdose every 24 minutes. In Massachusetts, the death toll is five people a day.

Chelsea Record: City Officials Claim Victory for Now in Sanctuary City Federal Case
The ruling by a federal judge in California’s 9th Circuit that President Donald Trump’s Sanctuary City executive order is unconstitutional has by extension created a “total victory” for the City in its own federal lawsuit filed in Boston Federal Court – the 1st Circuit.

Chelsea Record: State CPA Contribution Near to Nothing Just as Chelsea Joins In
Just as the City is about ready to name the new Community Preservation Act (CPA) Board members in the next month, the state’s matching fund is at record lows and almost down to nothing.

City Lab: California's Legal Assault On NIMBYs Begins
Over 100 bills aim to fix the state’s severe housing crisis, including many that would crack down on developers and communities that aren’t doing their part.

NYT: Housing Advocates Vow Sustained Protest of de Blasio Aide
For months, protesters hounded Mayor Bill de Blasio at town hall-style meetings and fund-raisers from Manhattan to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., demanding that he shut down New York City’s main jail complex on Rikers Island.

WBUR: Walsh Touts Affordable Housing Development For Downtown Boston
The city of Boston and real estate firm Related Beal on Tuesday announced plans for what they called the city's "first 100% affordable and workforce housing development to be built in more than 25 years."

Weekly Links

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

Wicked Local: Somerville community groups host ‘Day of Deluge’
Mayor Joseph Curtatone responded to a number of phone calls and Facebook posts last week, all urging him to take a stance in regards to FRIT’s affordable housing waiver request. The mayor said he would remain neutral.

Boston Curbed: Revere home prices range widely right now
Homes in Revere currently average $239 a square foot, according to an analysis of market-rate listings from real estate research site NeighborhoodX.

Revere Journal: Residents Concerned about Bellevue Ave Development
Citing an issue of parking, traffic and other concerns, neighbors of a proposed development at 5 Bellevue Ave., told city councillors that the size of the development was too big for the neighborhood.

Chelsea Record: Parking Restrictions in Cary Square Bring Drama to the Council
Urging the utilization of a little-used stipulation in the City Charter, a former city councillor asked the Council on Monday night to reverse the decision of the Traffic Commission in adding two-hour parking signs along Washington Avenue in Cary Square.

Wicked Local: Affordable housing for Watertown seniors is lacking
Watertown has about 1,000 affordable housing units per the state’s Subsidized Housing Inventory, or about 6.5 percent of the town’s housing stock, according to Jen Van Campen, executive director of Metro West Collaborative Development.

Boston Globe: Developers buy Necco site in Revere
But big changes also could be coming to where Necco currently cranks out its candies, seven miles away in Revere. Development firms Atlantic ...

NPR: Affordable Housing Program Costs More, Shelters Fewer
On the south side of Dallas, Nena Eldridge lives in a sparse but spotless bungalow on a dusty lot. At $550 each month, her rent is just about the cheapest she could find in the city.

The Washington Post: The nation's capital forfeits millions in affordable housing funds as homelessness surges. Why?
Driving into the nation’s capital along New York Avenue reveals an American social smash-cut.

Chelsea Record: New Application: ZBA says Strip Club is ‘Concert Hall,’ Club Will Go Back to Federal Court
Seth Daniel In a highly-anticipated meeting, the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) took on the Phantom Ventures strip club matter once again – after having it remanded back to the Board from a Federal Court judge – and decided that the venture should re-apply as a concert hall/theatre. After about one hour of...

Diversity in action

This afternoon, I went to pick up my books for a guest reading opportunity with The Chelsea Public Library’ Diversity In Action(DIA) program. The program’s main goal is to celebrate all of the wonderful languages spoken and cultures represented in Chelsea. Next week, I’ll be reading the bilingual edition, English-Khmerof “In here, out there!” by Phillipp Winterberg. I also hope to teach the students a few words of Khmer, the primary language of Cambodia. I’m excited to continue to contribute to the celebration of our community’s diversity and to strengthen our social fabric.  For more information about the DIA national program and the resources at Chelsea Public Library, stop by to visit them at 569 Broadway, Chelsea MA, 02150, (617)466-4352http://www.chelseama.gov/public-library.  Be sure to join me next week for the community event, Diversity in Action Chelsea Community Night on Wednesday, May 10th at 6pm. 

Baker-Polito Administration Awards Community Investment Tax Credits to 48 Community Development Corporations

 

Community Investment Tax Credits allow non-profit CDCs to leverage private investments for housing and services

BOSTON – Today the Baker-Polito Administration announced a total of $6 million in tax credit allocations to 46 Community Development Corporations (CDCs) and two Community Support Organizations under the state’s Community Investment Tax Credit (CITC) program.

The CITC program allows local residents and stakeholders to work with community development corporations, which partner with nonprofit, public and private entities to improve economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income households and communities. Since the program’s inception in 2014, CDCs across the Commonwealth have significantly increased their ability to raise funding from private investment: the CITC program has generated over $22.8 million in private investments across Massachusetts in the last three years.

“We are committed to working closely with local leaders and advocates to build stronger communities across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “This program will enable Community Development Corporations to address important local issues, build foundations for economic growth and opportunities to support those who need it most in their regions and neighborhoods.”

“Encouraging community and private partnerships can spur local investment and solutions in Massachusetts’ cities and towns,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “The increased community development capacity this program creates will drive growth across all zip codes in the Commonwealth.”

“Our municipalities have tremendous potential that Community Development Corporations help to leverage for sustained growth,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash. “This work, done across the Commonwealth, creates thriving communities with opportunities for all to participate in, and benefit from a growing economy.”

“Supporting our Community Development Corporations through the Community Investment Tax Credit helps them to help families find homes and jobs, grow businesses, and bring communities together,” said Undersecretary of Housing and Community Development Chrystal Kornegay. “This work helps our residents, supports our businesses, and grows our statewide economy.”

“We are grateful to the Baker-Polito Administration for its strong commitment to the community development field, as evidenced by this remarkable investment in Community Development Corporations across the state,” said Joseph Kriesberg, President & CEO of MACDC.  “These tax credit allocations are going to empower locally-driven, public-private partnerships that will expand economic opportunity and improve the quality of life in every corner of our state.”

The CITC program awards up to $150,000 in credit allocations to certified CDCs. CDCs apply for tax credits to support fundraising for the development and implementation of their community investment plan from the CITC program. Individuals, corporations and other entities that make a cash contribution resulting in a qualified investment to an awarded CDC will earn tax credits equal to fifty percent of the total qualified investment made by the taxpayer. CDCs were awarded credits based on the CDC’s demonstrated progress implementing its CIP and past utilization of previous credit allocations. 

 

2017 Community Investment Tax Credit Recipients:

ACT Lawrence: $50,000

Allston Brighton CDC: $150,000

Asian CDC (Boston): $135,000

Codman Square NDC (Dorchester): $150,000

Community Development Partnership (Eastham): $120,000

Community Teamwork Inc. (Lowell) : $129,615

Dorchester Bay EDC: $79,615

Downtown Taunton Foundation: $50,000

Fenway CDC (Boston): $150,000

Franklin County CDC (Greenfield): $129,615

Groundwork Lawrence: $150,000

Harborlight Community Partners (Beverly): $150,000

HAP Housing (Springfield): $150,000

Hilltown CDC (Chesterfield): $150,000

Housing Assistance Corp. Cape Cod: $150,000

Housing Corp. of Arlington: $129,615

Housing Nantucket: $150,000

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) (Boston): $129,615

Island Housing Trust (Martha’s Vineyard): $150,000

Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corp: $150,000

Just-A-Start (Cambridge): $125,000

Lawrence Community Works: $150,000

Lena Park CDC (Dorchester): $50,000

Local Initiatives Support Coalition Boston: $129,615

Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (Boston): $150,000

Madison Park CDC (Roxbury): $150,000

Main South CDC (Worcester): $125,000

NeighborWorks (Quincy): $129,615

NewVue Communities (Fitchburg): $150,000

Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (East Boston): $150,000

North Shore CDC (Salem): $129,615

Nuestra Comunidad (Roxbury): $150,000

Oak Hill CDC (Worcester): $129,615

Quaboag Valley CDC (Ware): $129,615

Revitalize CDC (Springfield): $150,000

Southern Middlesex Opportunity Council (Framingham): $150,000

Somerville Community Corp.: $150,000

South Boston NDC: $79,615

Southwest Boston CDC (Hyde Park): $60,000

The Neighborhood Developers (Chelsea): $150,000

Urban Edge (Roxbury): $150,000

Valley CDC (Holyoke): $150,000

WATCH CDC (Waltham): $129,615

WHALE (New Bedford): $129,615

Worcester Common Ground: $150,000

Worcester East Side CDC: $100,000

A release from governor's office