Open The Door to Human Rights

"Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home - so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world...Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world." - Eleanor Roosevelt

Today is Human Rights Day. Learn more about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which empowers us all, every day. http://bit.ly/19f9uJN #HomeMatters #StandUp4HumanRights #OpenTheDoor

Link It Over

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

MarketPlace: Investors make a bet to lift Boston-area neighborhood out of poverty
How do you raise the standard of living in the poorest neighborhoods in the country?

CityLab: How Congress's Tax Plans Could Kill a Million Affordable Homes in a Decade
The final tax bill that goes to the White House could have very little effect on housing affordability—or it could gut mechanisms for encouraging it.

Bostonomix: 14 Boston-Area Municipal Leaders Pledge To Increase Housing Production
In a new effort to try to ease the Boston area's high housing costs, 14 municipal leaders are pledging to work together to increase the pace of housing construction throughout the region.

TheAtlantic: The Never-Ending Foreclosure
How can the country survive the next economic crash if millions of families still haven't recovered from the last one?

Curbed: First-time homebuying 101: Tips for buying your first home
All the expert advice and tips you need to prepare for buying your first home.

CityLab: What the Republican Tax Bill Means for Commuters, Renters, and Retirees
The most serious effects of the House and Senate proposals would unfold over years for urban citizens.

Bloomberg: House Tax Bill Threatens to Make Housing Even Less Affordable for Poor
Even before Hurricane Harvey dumped 50 inches of rain on Houston, damaging hundreds of thousands of homes and apartments, affordable housing was already scarce. Because of rising rents, more than 200,000 low-income residents were spending over half their earnings on someplace to live.

UrbanWire: Housing and Housing Finance
America isn’t in a housing bubble, but some cities might be

NewYorkTime: The Great American Single-Family Home Problem
Building more housing, more densely, could help address a widespread economic challenge. A fight over one lot in Berkeley, Calif., shows how tough that could be.

Chelsea Record: ZBA Approves Eleanor Street Apartment Building
The Chelsea Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) approved a new apartment building project at 25 Eleanor St. on what is currently an industrial building with parking lot.

Jwtintelligence: Can Silicon Valley design the tech-optimized city of the future?
From smart clothing to smart buildings, the latest iteration of technology infiltrating the everyday is smart cities. Tech companies are hoping to become the next urban planner, with two projects announced this year from Google and Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

MotherJones: The Republican Tax Bill Would Gut Affordable Housing in America
Nearly a million rental units could be lost in the next decade.

HowHousingMatters: Why Educators, Health Professionals, and Others Focused on Economic Mobility Should Care about Housing
Cities striving to improve residents’ lives often focus on such issues as schools, parks, jobs, or health. Often overlooked is something equally fundamental.

LAWeekly: What Happens When Wall Street Is Your Landlord?
On the afternoon of Sept. 2, Robert Allen returned home from work earlier than usual to discover a guy posting a piece of paper to his front door. The uninvited guest said he worked for the landlord.

BostonGlobe: There’s barely any housing being built in the suburbs
Greater Boston is adding housing at a rapid clip, but really just in Boston and a handful of close-in cities. Most suburban towns aren’t building much at all.

 

242 Spencer Construction Update

 


We are writing to share a brief update regarding the construction of new affordable homes at 242 Spencer Avenue. If you do not want to receive these emails, you can click here to unsubscribe. You can also find these regular construction updates on our website

What's happening on the site? 
Since our last update in October, NEI General Contracting has been working on excavating soil from the site in order to prepare for the new building’s foundation. The soil that was unsuitable for construction was removed from the site and taken to a landfill.

The excavation began in the area of the site closest to the Stockton Street and Spencer Avenue intersection. Since that area was excavated, NEI proceeded with forming and pouring concrete for the foundation’s footings, and has begun pouring concrete foundation walls.

The foundation footings and walls are scheduled to be completed within the next two weeks.

Upcoming work on Stockton Street
Up next at the site, NEI will work on connections to the various utilities that will serve the new building – water, sewer, and fire protection. Currently, we expect this work to start next week, December 4, and it could last for approximately two weeks. Some portions of this work will require NEI to access underground utilities under portions of Stockton Street. While NEI will not be closing Stockton Street, the work may impact the flow of traffic. NEI will work with the City of Chelsea to take safety precautions as necessary throughout the duration of this work.

We understand that this will create some inconvenience for neighbors, and parents and staff of the Burke schools. NEI will make every effort to have this work completed as safely and efficiently as possible.

Who can I call? 
If you have any questions or concerns about the excavation and construction, please reach out to NEI General Contracting at the numbers below:

                Site Superintendent, Steve Miers: 508-509-1042
                Assistant Superintendent, Cory Madore: 339-235-0753
                Project Manager, Alex Garcia-Mendoza: 781-885-3742

For general questions about the 242 Spencer development, please reach out to The Neighborhood Developers:

                Cassie Mann: 617-889-1375

We know that any construction project will impact those who live, work, and go to school nearby. Both NEI General Contracting and The Neighborhood Developers, as well as all workers at 242 Spencer, will work to mitigate the impacts that this project will have on your day-to-day lives. 

We will continue to provide regular updates throughout construction, at least once per month. If you have friends, family, or neighbors who would like to stay informed about the project, please share this message with them. You can also check out our project website, which will be another place to follow updates during construction.

Thank you for reading and for your patience as we work to bring affordable homes to Chelsea families!
 

242 Spencer Construction Update

We are writing to share a brief update regarding the construction of new affordable homes at 242 Spencer Avenue. If you do not want to receive these emails, you can click here to unsubscribe. You can also find these regular construction updates on our website

What's happening on the site? 
As you may have seen, demolition of the French Naturalization Club building was completed over the past few weeks. We know that the demolition removal of debris from the site were loud and disruptive for the neighborhood, and we appreciate the patience neighbors have shown with this process.

This week, NEI General Contracting will work on removing the asphalt from the parking lots on the site. This process should take roughly one week. Starting next week, NEI will begin excavation on the site, in order to prepare for building the foundation of the new building. The excavation phase will take approximately one month to complete.

This work will involve heavy machinery on the site in order to move soil. NEI General Contracting will ensure that any soil stored on the site will be covered when not being actively used, in order to reduce dust. NEI will also continue to spray the site with water regularly to mitigate dust. 

What are the hours when construction can take place at the site? 
Under the City of Chelsea’s regulations, construction work can take place between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. on weekdays, and between 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. on Saturdays. No work may occur on Sundays.

We realize that, last Saturday October 14, work started earlier than these specified hours. This was a mistake on the general contractor’s part, and we have worked to clarify the allowed work times, and improve communication between the general contractor and any other subcontractors or workers on the site. The general contractor understands that they are not allowed to work outside of the City Chelsea’s approved hours.

Who can I call? 
If you have any questions or concerns about the excavation and construction, please reach out to NEI General Contracting at the numbers below:

                Site Superintendent, Cory Madore: 339-235-0753
                Project Manager, Alex Garcia-Mendoza: 781-885-3742

For general questions about the 242 Spencer development, please reach out to The Neighborhood Developers:

                Cassie Mann: 617-889-1375

We know that any construction project will impact those who live, work, and go to school nearby. Both NEI General Contracting and The Neighborhood Developers, as well as all workers at 242 Spencer, will work to mitigate the impacts that this project will have on your day-to-day lives. 

We will continue to provide regular updates throughout construction, at least once per month. If you have friends, family, or neighbors who would like to stay informed about the project, please share this message with them. You can also check out our project website, which will be another place to follow updates during construction.

Thank you for reading and for your patience as we work to bring affordable homes to Chelsea families!
 

242 Spencer Construction Update

We are writing to share a brief update regarding the construction of new affordable homes at 242 Spencer Avenue. If you do not want to receive these emails, you can click here to unsubscribe. You can also find these regular construction updates on our website

Demolition Starts Next Week
This message is to let you know that demolition of the existing building at 242 Spencer Avenue, the former French Naturalization Club, is scheduled to begin next week, on Tuesday, September 19.

Demolition may take approximately two to three weeks to complete. The work will be noisy. To protect against dust generated by the demolition of the building, NEI General Contracting will wet the demolition site and debris throughout demolition, and fully cover the trucks transporting debris off the project site. The Chelsea Fire Department will provide a fire watch on site until all of the combustible materials are removed from the building.  

If you have any questions about demolition and construction, please reach out to Alex Garcia-Mendoza or Steve Miers of NEI General Contracting:

Alex: 781-885-3742
Steve: 508-509-1042


For general questions about the 242 Spencer development, please reach out to Cassie Mann of The Neighborhood Developers:

Cassie: 617-889-1375

We know that any construction project will impact those who live, work, and go to school nearby. Both NEI General Contracting and The Neighborhood Developers, as well as all workers at 242 Spencer, will work to mitigate the impacts that this project will have on your day-to-day lives.

We will continue to provide regular updates throughout construction, at least once per month. If you have friends, family, or neighbors who would like to stay informed about the project, please share this message with them. You can also check out our project website, which will be another place to follow updates during construction: www.TheNeighborhoodDevelopers.org/242-Spencer

Thank you for reading and for your patience as we work to bring affordable homes to Chelsea families!
 

242 Spencer Construction Update

 

Thank you to everyone who came to the pre-construction meeting about 242 Spencer in August. We hope that you’re enjoying the end of summer! Throughout construction, The Neighborhood Developers will send updates about construction at least monthly, so that neighbors know who to contact with questions or concerns. Construction began earlier this week, and will continue into fall 2018. The Neighborhood Developers will update you on the work happening on site, and provide contact information to reach us and our general contractor. If you don’t want to receive these emails, please click here to unsubscribe from this list.

Construction Fence and Traffic Plan
Temporary fencing that has been put up around 242 Spencer Avenue and the triangular parcel across Spencer Avenue. This fencing was installed by our general contractor, NEI General Contracting, in order to ensure the security of the project site, as well as the safety of neighbors, pedestrians and vehicles passing by, as part of a plan approved by the City of Chelsea’s Traffic and Parking Commission.

For those who attended the pre-construction meeting we held on August 9, you will notice that the location of the fence is different from what was presented at that meeting.

The temporary fencing is now placed so that the sidewalk on the western side of Spencer Avenue and one lane of Spencer Avenue between Eastern Avenue and Stockton Street are closed to vehicles and pedestrians. This will allow for the contractor to safely maneuver equipment. Spencer Avenue is still open to vehicle traffic, and will remain so throughout the project, with few temporary interruptions for utility work. Within the next few weeks, this temporary fence will be replaced with jersey barriers and chain link fence for greater security of the project site.

On September 15, the sidewalk on the northern side of Stockton Street will be closed to pedestrian use, and will remain closed throughout construction. The construction fence will be placed on the surface of Stockton Street, but both travel lanes will remain open.

The fencing has blocked off the five parking spaces that existed along the property’s frontage on Spencer Avenue. To make up for this change, the fence around the triangular parcel across Spencer Avenue now allows room for five parking spaces for the use of residents, including during pick-up and drop-off for students at the Burke elementary schools.

After conferring with the City, the project team determined that this plan would be safer throughout construction, while still allowing the same number of parking spaces as the plan we proposed at our meeting on August 9. (To see an image of the site fencing plan approved by the City, click here.)

What’s Happening on the Site?
During the week of September 5, workers were on site to disconnect electricity and gas to the building, and to remove utility poles that served the building. Workers are continuing to remove debris from inside the building.

Demolition of the building is scheduled to begin the week of September 18. As we mentioned at our pre-construction meeting, NEI General Contracting will mitigate dust that may be generated by the demolition process by wetting the demolition site and debris throughout demolition, and fully covering trucks transporting debris off the project site.  

Who can I call?
Starting the week of September 18, NEI General Contracting will have a full-time site superintendent for construction. As the superintendent, Steve Miers will be on site daily to coordinate all of the work being done on the project. He will be the first person to call if you have a question or concern about construction, and we will provide his contact information in our next email update. Until Steve arrives on site, please continue to reach out to Alex Garcia-Mendoza of NEI General Contracting, or Cassie Mann of The Neighborhood Developers, at the numbers below:

 

Alex: 781-885-3742

Cassie: 617-889-1375 x129


We know that any construction project will impact those who live, work, and go to school nearby. Both NEI General Contracting and The Neighborhood Developers, as well as all workers at 242 Spencer, will work to mitigate the impacts that this project will have on your day-to-day lives. We will continue to update you throughout construction. If you have friends, family, or neighbors who would like to stay informed about the project, please share this message with them. Our project website will be launching soon, and will be another resource for regular updates during construction.

Thank you for reading and for your patience as we work to bring affordable homes to Chelsea families!

Link It Over

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

Everett Independent: St Therese’s Church to Be Developed into Elderly, Middle-Income Housing
The old St. Therese’s Church on Broadway was well known for spending nearly 1,500 days in a vigil protest of the closing of the beloved Parish.

ProPublica: Facebook (Still) Letting Housing Advertisers Exclude Users by Race
After ProPublica revealed last year that Facebook advertisers could target housing ads to whites only, the company announced it had built a system to spot and reject discriminatory ads. We retested and found major omissions.

StrongTowns: 4 Easy Steps To Squash The "There's No Parking" Argument
I wish I had a bus ticket for every time I heard someone say this. Unless you're Manhattan or San Francisco, it is fair to say you don't have a parking problem. I take that back. You do have a parking problem – there’s too much of it.

Washington Post: The left reconsiders zoning
Many on the political left have begun to rethink restrictive zoning and point out the ways in which it makes housing more expensive for the poor and lower middle class, and deprives them of job opportunities.

The Hill: Tax reform could be catastrophic for millions of low-income families
Nearly 1 million homes affordable to low-income families, seniors and veterans are at risk as Congress negotiates a final tax bill. That’s 1 million households whose stability, health and economic well-being is threatened. We cannot let this happen.

The Urban Edge: How The Low Income Housing Tax Credit Process Affects Access To Jobs, Good Schools And More
In Houston, roughly 37 percent of homeowners and renters spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing costs, according to 2015 estimates from the Census Bureau. That bar is often used as a measure of affordability and Houston, like many other cities across the country, is facing a shortage of affordable housing.

WBUR: Wynn Casino Opens Final Phase Of Environmental Cleanup
Riding up the Mystic River, you can see all of the work underway to build the resort casino coming to the Boston area in about 18 more months.

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: Budget Briefs: The Republican Two-Step Fiscal Agenda
Congressional Republicans this fall are poised to launch step one of a likely two-step tax and budget agenda: enacting costly tax cuts now that are heavily skewed toward wealthy households and profitable corporations, then paying for them later through program cuts mostly affecting low- and middle-income families.

The Salem News: Company donates land for future city housing credits
A small-scale affordable housing complex is set to occupy a vacant lot at 2 Hardy St., behind where Beverly Crossing recently built a new apartment building at 131 Rantoul St.

City Lab: The Arc of Gentrification Bends Towards Spike Lee
Spike Lee’s beef with gentrification in Brooklyn comes full circle in his new “She’s Gotta Have It” Netflix series.

Link It Over

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

MHP: Analysis: House tax reform would drastically cut state's affordable production, preservation
BOSTON --- An analysis by the Massachusetts Housing Partnership in conjunction with the state’s key housing agencies shows that the House tax reform bill currently under consideration would reduce the production and preservation of affordable housing in Massachusetts by approximately 69 percent.

JCHS: A Shared Future: Fostering Communities of Inclusion in an Era of Inequality
Almost 50 years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, what would it take to meaningfully reduce residential segregation and/or mitigate its negative consequences in the United States?

Zumper: Boston Neighborhood Prices Mapped This Fall 2017
Coming ahead of Los Angeles, Oakland, and Seattle, Boston was the 5th most expensive city to rent in the nation. The price of one and two bedroom units settled at medians of $2,200 and $2,610, respectively.

HSH: The salary you must earn to buy a home in the 50 largest metros
See below exactly how much salary you would need to earn in order to afford the principal, interest, taxes and insurance payments on a median-priced home in the 50 most populous metropolitan areas.

StrongTowns: PARKING MINIMUMS MUST DIE
A few years ago, I came up with the idea that we should go out and take photos of half-empty parking lots on Black Friday and post them online just to show people how silly parking requirements are.

CoDesign: The Airbnb For Affordable Housing Is Here
Nesterly, a new platform that pairs older homeowners with young renters, is riding a wave of interest in multigenerational living.

Chelsea Record: Brass Tax: some residents will see a decrease in property taxes this year
The Chelsea City Council unanimously set the property tax rates for residential and commercial properties on Monday night, instituting an increased 27.5 percent owner-occupant exemption that will lead to a reduction in taxes for most single-family homeowners.

Revere Journal: Capital Improvement Plan Details Revere’s Focus Through 2022
It was capital improvement night at the City Council on Monday night, when Mayor Brian Arrigo presented a report detailing a proposed capital improvement plan and a plan for the Department of Public Works facility.

CityLab: The Story Behind the Housing Meme That Swept the Internet
How a popular meme about neoliberal capitalism and fast-casual architecture owned itself.

Link It Over

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

CityLab: The Fight Over Fair Housing Goes to Court (Again)
Civil rights groups are fighting the suspension of a HUD rule they say helps low-income families move to better neighborhoods.

ChelseaRecord: New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community
In years past, when it was severely cold, those living on the streets of Chelsea had nowhere to go but under blankets.

WashingtonPost: America’s affordable-housing stock dropped by 60 percent from 2010 to 2016
The number of apartments deemed affordable for very low-income families across the United States fell by more than 60 percent between 2010 and 2016, according to a new report by Freddie Mac.

HousingWire: Thousands of groups call on Congress to use MID savings for low-income housing
Organizations, state and local governments and elected officials stand together.

EverettIndependent: Beacham Street Re-Design to Focus on Freight, Bikes and Pedestrians
Beacham Street is a critical corridor for the region’s food supply, with it being one of the only ways that large semi-trucks can get fruits and vegetables from the New England Produce Market to the highway.

CityLab: The New 'Digital' Sanctuaries
Cities that were at the forefront of limiting their own participation in aggressive federal immigration enforcement are now expanding the scope of their work: Protecting their residents from data-collection and surveillance, too.

RevereJournal: Voters Approve Question 1
Revere voters overwhelming approved Ballot Question 1 by a vote of 4543 to 1,398 in Tuesday’s election.  The approval would give a tax break of about $450 to about 1,000 senior citizens who want to stay in their homes.

Forbes: Does Gentrification Help Or Harm Small Businesses?
Gentrification is all about renovating neighborhoods so that people who are affluent will want to live in them.

MarketWatch: Republican tax plan could grind affordable housing construction to a virtual halt
The tax plan proposed by Congressional Republicans will likely decimate production of new affordable rental housing, even as housing shortages across the country are driving rents higher and taking ever-larger shares of Americans’ incomes.

TheGuardian: Gentrification is sweeping through America. Here are the people fighting back
In Atlanta, a neighborhood is resisting the use of eminent domain, which allows government to take private property for public use

WickedLocal_Medford: COLLINS: Poverty and the working class
Working-class poverty means never being able to pay all the bills. You rob Peter to pay Paul. You pay the electric bill this month, the water bill next month.

The Conversation: How the proposed budget and tax cuts could stunt new affordable housing
Low-income Americans are already struggling to keep a roof over their heads due to a growing affordable housing shortage.

NEXTCity: Meet the New Immigrants Reviving a Philadelphia Neighborhood
In Oxford Circle, one in four residents was born outside the U.S. Their futures are the future of Philadelphia.

Link It Over

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

CityLab: Why Is 'Affordable' Housing So Expensive to Build?
As costs keep rising, it’s becoming harder and harder for governments to subsidize projects like they’ve done in the past.

Chelsea Record: Four Councillors Call for Building Moratorium Regarding Parking ‘Crisis’
Four Chelsea City Councillors called for a one-year moratorium on all building projects that cannot meet the off-street parking requirements spelled out in the City’s zoning regulations.

Boston Globe: Building more homes means crowded schools, right? Not so, study says
It’s long been a truism thrown about during suburban housing debates: More homes in a town means more kids in the schools.

Revere Journal: Paying Big Bucks:Several Key Properties Bought by New Developers
Westbrook Partners, of New York City, have acquired the 194-unit Vanguard at Waterfront Square luxury apartment community on Revere Beach, which opened in 2016, for $59.85 million in cash. The sale amounts to approximately $308,505 per unit.

Fast Company: Living In A Dense City Makes Citizens Healthier
More density means less obesity. But there’s a sweet spot: Too much density is bad, too.

CityLab: Where Evictions Hurt the Most
A new Apartment List report aims to more accurately estimate the scope of America’s eviction problem.

WBUR: The Evolving Vocational-Tech School: Preparing Students For Work In Growing Fields
This story is part of a BostonomiX series called “The Future Of Work” that examines the jobs of the future and the skills needed for those jobs.

CityLab: The Rise of the Rich Renter
“The rise in higher-income renter households may mask the significant housing affordability challenges faced by lower-income renter households.”

Brookings: Yet more evidence that housing affordability is getting worse
Evidence continues to pile up revealing that housing affordability is getting worse, particularly for low-income households.

Everett Independent: Master Plan for Malden River Greenway Completed, Ready
The Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA), in partnership with the cities of Everett, Malden, and Medford, announced the completion this week of the Malden River Greenway Vision Plan to reimagine the future of the Malden River.

Fast Company: What Happens When Land Is More Expensive Than The Buildings On Top?
Because of policies that prevent density, cities have ended up in a position where the value of land vastly outstrips the value of the buildings on them.

 

 

 

LINK IT OVER

Links from the web that we found relevant. They don't always represent our point of view, but they're interesting:

CNBC: No full-time minimum-wage worker can afford a 2-bedroom apartment in any US state
The absolute least that an employer is legally allowed to pay an employee for an hour's work varies across the country, but one fact remains constant: In no state does working 40 hours a week for minimum wage enable a person to rent a median two-bedroom apartment.

Chelsea Record: French Club Comes Down to Make Way for Affordable Housing
After hundreds of athletic banquets, wedding receptions and a whose who list of Chelsea political functions, that history all came tumbling down last Friday when the French Naturalization Club on Spencer Avenue was demolished for affordable housing.

WBUR: Bostonians, Today's The Deadline To Register To Vote In Next Month's Election
Wednesday is the last day Boston residents can register if they want to vote in the city's municipal election on Nov. 7.

CityLab: Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was
With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

Co.Design: Alphabet Inc. Plans A Beta City
Can Alphabet and Sidewalk Labs produce great urban design? Toronto is about to find out.

Chelsea Record: Economic Independence: Chelsea Among Four Housing Authorities to Receive $389,000 in Planning Grants
Lieutenant Gov. Karyn Polito announced a total of $389,000 in planning and predevelopment grants for Housing Authorities in Chelsea, Gloucester, New Bedford and Taunton to pursue implementation of Worcester Housing Authority-pioneered ‘A Better Life’ programming.

WGBH: Senate Promotes Justice Reform; Prepares For Clash With The House
The state House and Senate are headed toward a showdown over how to overhaul the criminal justice system.

CityLab: America Can't Fix Poverty Until It Stops Hating Poor People
A bipartisan plea to stop “othering” those living on the economic margins.

Banker&Tradesman: MassHousing Seizes Opportunity In Low-Interest-Rate Environment
Over the past two years, Massachusetts has preserved more affordable housing units than ever before.

Sampan: Mayor Walsh joins community members to celebrate preservation of 52 units of affordable housing in Fenway
Mayor Martin J. Walsh today joined representatives from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the Fenway Community Development Corporation (CDC)…

ChelseaRecord: Chelsea’s Commitment to Industrial Areas Spurs Major Purchases
Residential is king in today’s development world, with developers vying for land to build luxury apartments where previously no one would have even parked their car.

EverettIndependent: Major Property Owner in Village Area Sees Transformation
When Gerry Berberian started buying forgotten industrial land in Everett’s Village area on Air Force Road, not in the furthest reaches of his mind did he ever consider the area could become as popular