Weekly Links

Below are some links we found from around the web that we thought were relevant to our work. These articles don't always represent our point of view, but it's interesting to know what people are saying :

Boston Globe: How many evictions are there in Boston? No one really knows.
As Boston officials ramp up efforts to combat evictions, they’re running into a problem: No one really knows how many evictions there are.

CNU: How to get by-right zoning right
The Form-Based Coding process ensures that the discussion about where and what type of housing to allow happens at a community level, rather than on a project-by-project basis.

Boston Globe: Boston should celebrate federal housing aid while it can
Monday could well mark the end of an era — the last major federal investment in public housing that Boston can expect to see for a long time.

Chelsea Record: Residents Begin Dreaming of New Housing with Corcoran
As adults talked and listened to the potentially big plans for redevelopment of the Innes Housing Development on Central Avenue, off in the corner little children were also dreaming.

ACLU: Affordable Housing is a Civil Right
Envision Transform Build – East Palo Alto, a coalition of community groups, recently announced a groundbreaking partnership with Facebook and the cities of East Palo Alto and Menlo Park to develop innovative solutions to tackle affordable housing, displacement, and economic opportunity in the Bay Area.

Wall Street Journal: Some Families Earn Six Figures and Still Need Help With the Rent
Cities beyond New York and San Francisco move to set aside apartments for middle-income households; Cambridge, Mass., with $2,750 median rents, holds housing lottery.

Scientific American: Could Ben Carson Be Just What the Doctor Ordered for HUD?
Advocates say the neurosurgeon could make a difference by focusing on the many health dangers that beset public housing

New York Times: Critics Worry Over How Ben Carson, Lacking Expertise in Public Housing, Will Lead It
WASHINGTON — Big-city mayors and housing experts are nervous about the idea of a billionaire real estate developer in the White House.