Development

Homes at 242 Spencer

Homes are the cornerstone of health and opportunity. 2018 marks The Neighborhood Developers’ (TND) 40th year bringing homes to Chelsea. Under Construction at 242 Spencer, the framework for  high-quality, well-managed homes is being erected. TND’s newest affordable rental housing development, consisting of 34 units, all at or below 60 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI), with 11 units restricted to extremely low-income households at or below 30 percent of AMI.

242 Spencer is located in a mixed-use neighborhood that provides excellent access to Chelsea’s four public elementary schools and public transportation, including two MBTA bus routes that connect residents to the MBTA Blue Line and other points in Chelsea, Revere and East Boston. Within a five-minute walk of the development site are local shopping options, public parks, and Beth Israel Deaconness’ Chelsea medical facilities. The City of Chelsea has demonstrated support for the development of affordable apartments at 242 Spencer as a means to create lasting affordability for current Chelsea residents and for those from neighboring communities that are facing the regional pressure of rapidly growing housing costs.

TND will partner with Housing Families to provide services to families in eight units reserved for formerly homeless or at-risk families.

In The Press

 

A special thanks to our funders:

  • Equity: RBC Tax Credit Equity Group

  • Federal and State Low Income Housing Tax Credits: The Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development

  • Tax-Exempt Bond Financing: MassDevelopment

  • Construction and Permanent Financing: Boston Private Bank

  • Subordinate Debt: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development; Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation; and North Suburban HOME Program

  • Predevelopment, Acquisition and Construction Financing: The Life Initiative

 

Highland Terrace LEED certification

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as “LEED,” was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones.

  • Highland Terrace is the first property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio that pursued LEED certification. The U.S. Green Building Council recognized Highland Terrace with “Platinum” status – the highest ranking possible. Highland Terrace was the first building in Chelsea to be recognized as LEED Platinum. Highland Terrace and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:
  • Site Selection: Highland Terrace is an urban infill development, redeveloping a former industrial property, close to downtown Chelsea. It puts an underused property back to productive use, and reduces demand for development of undisturbed open space. Highland Terrace uses existing infrastructure, and promotes public transit and walking so that residents have multiple transportation options.
  • Site Design: With a density of 35 units per acre, Highland Terrace protects undisturbed land by developing housing a more compact site, and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life to the Box District and new residents to downtown. The public park next door provides children and adults with space for outdoor recreation. The site is designed to reduce erosion and stormwater runoff. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings and minimizes the use of grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  •   Materials & Resources: During construction, Highland Terrace’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project used products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of Highland Terrace’s apartments include high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, and the property’s landscape irrigation system includes a central shut-off valve and moisture sensor, to minimize water use. Highland Terrace was also certified under the Energy Star program, based on its reduction of electricity usage and efficient mechanical systems.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation, and each apartment has high-grade air filters typically used in schools and other institutional settings, to stop contaminants from entering homes. Highland Terrace has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments and without a parking garage – both of which are common sources of lower air quality. (Parking is available to residents in a surface lot, adjacent to the building.)
  •   Education and Operations:  As part of developing Highland Terrace, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living. This will include training on operation and use of the property, including its green features.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to the Box District neighborhood. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

525 Beach LEED certification

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as LEED, was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones. 525 Beach is the second property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio to be certified under the LEED program. 525 Beach and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:

  • Site Selection: 525 Beach is an urban infill development, redeveloping a former industrial property in a dense residential neighborhood of Revere. 525 Beach’s 30 new apartments are only a five-minute walk from the MBTA Blue Line and Revere Beach, connecting residents to valuable amenities by walking. The development puts an underutilized property back to productive use, which reduces demand for undisturbed open space. 525 Beach uses existing infrastructure, and promotes public transit and walking so that residents have multiple transportation options.
  • Site Design: With a density of 71 units per acre, 525 Beach protects undisturbed land by developing housing on a compact site and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life. Revere Beach and Costa Park, a local public park, are within a five-minute walk, which provides children and adults with space for outdoor recreation. The site is designed to reduce erosion and stormwater runoff. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings, does not use any grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  • Materials & Resources: During construction, 525 Beach’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project will also use products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of 525 Beach’s apartments will feature high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, and the property’s landscape irrigation system is designed to minimize water usage. The building’s exterior walls are designed to moderate temperature within the building, to reduce the energy needed to heat and cool the building. In the building’s hallways, the lights operate on occupancy sensors, which reduces the amount of electricity used.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. The apartments’ walls are carefully sealed to minimize the transfer of air across apartments or into the hallway, and fresh air is delivered directly to each apartment through sealed ducts. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation. 525 Beach has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments – a common source of lower air quality.
  • Education and Operations:  As part of developing 525 Beach, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living.  This has included promoting LEED and “green” design to residents when they moved into the building, and training the property maintenance staff on operation and use of the property, including its green features.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to Revere. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

One Beach LEED Mid-Rise Program

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, more commonly known as “LEED,” was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2000 to promote practical design and construction methods that benefit the environment. The LEED program applies to many different types of development in the built environment and can be implemented by developers of new properties and owners of existing ones. One Beach is the third property within The Neighborhood Developers’ real estate portfolio to be certified under the LEED program. One Beach and the LEED program approach environmental sustainability through several criteria:

  • Site Selection: One Beach is located in downtown Revere, which gives its residents excellent access to neighborhood amenities and public transit. Within a half-mile walk are local shops, cafes and bank branches, parks, the Revere Public Library, the Rossetti-Cowan Senior Center, and places of worship. Three MBTA bus routes – the 116, 117 and 119 – have stops immediately in front of the building. Residents have multiple transportation options, and can reach their day-to-day needs by walking, which reduces the need to use a car and the number of vehicle miles traveled. The development also puts a vacant property back to productive use, which reduces demand for undisturbed open space and uses existing infrastructure.
  • Site Design: With a density of 71 units per acre, One Beach protects undisturbed land by developing housing on a compact site and enlivens the surrounding neighborhood by introducing more street life. The site’s landscaping uses only native plantings, does not use any grass, whose maintenance is water intensive, and instead maximizes drought-tolerant plants.
  • Materials & Resources: During construction, One Beach’s general contractor tracked how construction waste was thrown away, specifically focusing on recycling excess materials. Where possible, the project will also use products with recycled content or low emissions, including the flooring and paints. No tropical wood was used in the design.
  • Water & Energy Efficiency: All of One Beach’s apartments include high-efficiency showers, bathroom sinks and toilets, reducing the use of water. The landscaping’s irrigation system is also designed to use water efficiently. The system uses drip irrigation, and it knows when there was a recent rainstorm, so not to waste water. The building’s exterior walls are designed to moderate temperature within the building, by using a thick, spray-foam insulation in the exterior wall cavities and below the roof. This type of insulation reduce the energy needed to heat and cool the building.
  • Indoor Air Quality: During construction, all ducts and vents were sealed to minimize dirt, dust, or other contamination that could enter them. The apartments’ walls are carefully sealed to minimize the transfer of air across apartments or into the hallway, and fresh air is delivered directly to each apartment through sealed ducts. Bathroom and kitchen exhaust systems are designed to meet high industry standards that improve air circulation. One Beach has also been designed without any fireplaces in apartments and without a parking garage – both of which are common sources of lower air quality. (Parking is available to residents in a surface lot, adjacent to the building.)
  • Education and Operations:  As part of developing One Beach, TND will work with the property manager, Winn Residential, and the property’s residents to continue our commitment to green living. This has included promoting LEED and “green” design to residents when they moved into the building, training the property maintenance staff on operation and use of the property, including its green features, and promoting LEED at the construction site and in the local newspaper.

TND is proud to participate in the LEED program and we are excited about the benefits it brings to Revere. For more information about LEED, please visit the U.S. Green Building Council’s website: http://www.usgbc.org/

 

Baker-Polito Administration Awards Community Investment Tax Credits to 48 Community Development Corporations

 

Community Investment Tax Credits allow non-profit CDCs to leverage private investments for housing and services

BOSTON – Today the Baker-Polito Administration announced a total of $6 million in tax credit allocations to 46 Community Development Corporations (CDCs) and two Community Support Organizations under the state’s Community Investment Tax Credit (CITC) program.

The CITC program allows local residents and stakeholders to work with community development corporations, which partner with nonprofit, public and private entities to improve economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income households and communities. Since the program’s inception in 2014, CDCs across the Commonwealth have significantly increased their ability to raise funding from private investment: the CITC program has generated over $22.8 million in private investments across Massachusetts in the last three years.

“We are committed to working closely with local leaders and advocates to build stronger communities across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “This program will enable Community Development Corporations to address important local issues, build foundations for economic growth and opportunities to support those who need it most in their regions and neighborhoods.”

“Encouraging community and private partnerships can spur local investment and solutions in Massachusetts’ cities and towns,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “The increased community development capacity this program creates will drive growth across all zip codes in the Commonwealth.”

“Our municipalities have tremendous potential that Community Development Corporations help to leverage for sustained growth,” said Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash. “This work, done across the Commonwealth, creates thriving communities with opportunities for all to participate in, and benefit from a growing economy.”

“Supporting our Community Development Corporations through the Community Investment Tax Credit helps them to help families find homes and jobs, grow businesses, and bring communities together,” said Undersecretary of Housing and Community Development Chrystal Kornegay. “This work helps our residents, supports our businesses, and grows our statewide economy.”

“We are grateful to the Baker-Polito Administration for its strong commitment to the community development field, as evidenced by this remarkable investment in Community Development Corporations across the state,” said Joseph Kriesberg, President & CEO of MACDC.  “These tax credit allocations are going to empower locally-driven, public-private partnerships that will expand economic opportunity and improve the quality of life in every corner of our state.”

The CITC program awards up to $150,000 in credit allocations to certified CDCs. CDCs apply for tax credits to support fundraising for the development and implementation of their community investment plan from the CITC program. Individuals, corporations and other entities that make a cash contribution resulting in a qualified investment to an awarded CDC will earn tax credits equal to fifty percent of the total qualified investment made by the taxpayer. CDCs were awarded credits based on the CDC’s demonstrated progress implementing its CIP and past utilization of previous credit allocations. 

 

2017 Community Investment Tax Credit Recipients:

ACT Lawrence: $50,000

Allston Brighton CDC: $150,000

Asian CDC (Boston): $135,000

Codman Square NDC (Dorchester): $150,000

Community Development Partnership (Eastham): $120,000

Community Teamwork Inc. (Lowell) : $129,615

Dorchester Bay EDC: $79,615

Downtown Taunton Foundation: $50,000

Fenway CDC (Boston): $150,000

Franklin County CDC (Greenfield): $129,615

Groundwork Lawrence: $150,000

Harborlight Community Partners (Beverly): $150,000

HAP Housing (Springfield): $150,000

Hilltown CDC (Chesterfield): $150,000

Housing Assistance Corp. Cape Cod: $150,000

Housing Corp. of Arlington: $129,615

Housing Nantucket: $150,000

Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) (Boston): $129,615

Island Housing Trust (Martha’s Vineyard): $150,000

Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corp: $150,000

Just-A-Start (Cambridge): $125,000

Lawrence Community Works: $150,000

Lena Park CDC (Dorchester): $50,000

Local Initiatives Support Coalition Boston: $129,615

Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (Boston): $150,000

Madison Park CDC (Roxbury): $150,000

Main South CDC (Worcester): $125,000

NeighborWorks (Quincy): $129,615

NewVue Communities (Fitchburg): $150,000

Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (East Boston): $150,000

North Shore CDC (Salem): $129,615

Nuestra Comunidad (Roxbury): $150,000

Oak Hill CDC (Worcester): $129,615

Quaboag Valley CDC (Ware): $129,615

Revitalize CDC (Springfield): $150,000

Southern Middlesex Opportunity Council (Framingham): $150,000

Somerville Community Corp.: $150,000

South Boston NDC: $79,615

Southwest Boston CDC (Hyde Park): $60,000

The Neighborhood Developers (Chelsea): $150,000

Urban Edge (Roxbury): $150,000

Valley CDC (Holyoke): $150,000

WATCH CDC (Waltham): $129,615

WHALE (New Bedford): $129,615

Worcester Common Ground: $150,000

Worcester East Side CDC: $100,000

A release from governor's office

Speaking up for homes and jobs!

Call your representatives, and tell them that you want more affordable homes in your community!

Re-imagining Broadway

Thank you to everyone who attended Re-imagining Broadway’s community workshop on April 5 at the Williams School. The City of Chelsea and its project team received great input from attendees on how to improve and revitalize Broadway.

The presentation is now available in English and in Spanish on the Documents section of the project website.

Feedback on Ideas
All of the meeting boards with ideas for improving downtown circulation (street direction, enhanced squares) are also available online for your review and feedback.

If you would like to send the project team feedback on these ideas, please click on the link here: https://qplus.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_diLDe7ffuLQDPaB

Parking Survey
We also want to remind you that the project’s parking survey is still open. If you have not completed it yet, please do so now. Your input will help us develop a deeper understanding of how well our existing parking supplies, policies, and management approach are serving the needs and expectations of our Downtown Chelsea business owners, employees, residents, and visitors.

This survey (available in English and Spanish) should take 5-7 minutes to complete. All responses will remain confidential and only be reported in the aggregate.

English: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ChelseaParking
Spanish: https://es.surveymonkey.com/r/ChelseaEstacionamiento

Visit Re-imagining Broadway's website at www.ReimaginingBroadway.net to learn more about the project and to sign up for emails.

Thank you,
The Re-imagining Broadway Project Team
 
Re-imagining Broadway is a planning effort, led by the City of Chelsea, to develop strategies to improve access and mobility for all users to downtown. The plan will focus not just on a redesign of downtown circulation, but also how that redesign will support businesses, residents, shoppers, workers, students, and all other travelers.

The goals of this effort are to:

  • Enhance how public space is used and accessed downtown
  • Support existing businesses and encourage new growth
  • Beautify the area and create a consistent, vibrant look
  • Improve overall safety for all users
  • Establish a circulation pattern that works for cars, buses, pedestrians, transit riders, and bicyclists

Thanks to the foresight and diligence of the Chelsea City Council and City Manager Thomas G. Ambrosino, the City of Chelsea continues to invest in Chelsea’s infrastructure to make transformative change. This plan is not an independent effort; it is one piece of the larger ongoing improvements being made in downtown and throughout Chelsea.